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Self-management support by health care providers in prenatal Shared Medical Appointments (CenteringPregnancy©) and prenatal individual appointments

Publicatie van Kenniscentrum Zorginnovatie
A.H.C. Tsiamparlis-Wildeboer, E.I. Feijen-De Jong, M.T. Lohuizen,van, E. Slagt-Tichelman, A. Jonge,de, F. Scheele | Artikel | Publicatiedatum: 23 november 2022
Objective This cross-sectional questionnaire study investigates if there a difference in the extent to which health care providers in prenatal Shared Medical Appointments (CenteringPregnancy©) and in prenatal individual appointments support self-management in patient education. It also investigates if there is a difference in the extent to which health care providers in CenteringPregnancy@ and in individual appointments pay attention to the factors of the Integrated Model for Behavioral Change (I-Change) in supporting self-management. Methods Dutch health care providers in prenatal care were invited to fill out a questionnaire. Respondents who provided care in CenteringPregnancy© formed the CenteringPregnancy© group, the others were categorized in the individual appointments’ group. After a definition of self-management and an introduction of the I-Change model, respondents were asked if they supported self-management and if they paid attention to the I-Change model for each of 17 themes of prenatal patient education. Pearson’s chi-squared tests and Fisher’s Exact tests were performed to compare both groups. Results We included 133 respondents. Health care providers in the CenteringPregnancy@ group supported self-management to a higher extent compared to the individual appointments group. This difference was statistically significant for eight themes (body position and exercises, oral health, domestic violence, birth mechanism and premature birth, postnatal period, transition from pregnancy to parenthood, taking care of the baby and newborn’s safety). In both groups, health care providers paid most attention to information or to awareness factors instead of motivation factors. Conclusion We found a first prove that health care providers in CenteringPregnancy@ support self-management to a higher extent than health care providers in individual appointments. This could be explained by factors as time, feelings of safety and bonding, continuity of care and emphasis on future health behaviour changes. For effective self-management support, attention to motivation factors is important. However, we found that health care providers in both groups paid more attention to information or to awareness factors than to motivation. Practice implications Health care providers in prenatal individual appointments should be aware of the fact that they possibly support self-management less than health care providers in CenteringPregnancy@ . Health care providers in both types of prenatal care should be aware of the fact that they pay little attention to motivation factors. They might need some skills to change their role from teaching professional to supportive leader.

Auteur(s) - verbonden aan Hogeschool Rotterdam

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